Exploring Reims 

We arrived at our first continental city, Reims, around 1pm. The journey on A26 was very smooth and we found the hotel without much trouble.

Our abode at Reims…

The only food we had so far was coffee and pastry at Folkestone, therefore, we were rather peckish. ‘Shall we find some grub?’ Mum and I hit the town centre of Reims.

At a statue we found on Place Drouet d’Erlon…

We sauntered Place Drouet d’Erlon towards north and decided to have lunch at Restaurant L’Edito. The thoroughfare was lined with various cafes and restaurants, and was reasonably crowded with the people who were enjoying sunny Friday afternoon. ‘Let’s sit outside and enjoy people-watching!’ So we sat at one of their table along the promenade.

Mum opted for seafood paella…

And I picked salad with roast chicken…

It was rather breezy and a little on the chilly side as the recent heatwave was yet to develop over Europe which made me regret about ordering a cold salad instead of hot food!

After lunch, we went to look for the famous cathedral of Reims.

We found a cute merry-go-around by a local church…

Mum’s knee seemed to be ok so we walked slowly towards Rue du Trésor from which we approached the cathedral.

The spire of the cathedral soaring towards the sky…

As a cathedral, Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Reims is not as high profile internationally as namesakes in Paris and Strasbourg. However, the church is the place in which the very first king of the Franks, Clovis was baptised by Saint Remi in 498. Since then, 29 kings of France were crowned at the cathedral between 1027 and 1825.

Another famous character of the cathedral, Jeanne d’Arc…

This brave woman liberated the cathedral from the English and helped the Dauphin Charles to be crowned king on the 17th July 1547.

The window of the Baptism was adorned with stained glass window created by Marc Chagall…

I was rather surprised by the relative newness of the stained glass windows. Having said that, France, especially northern France, went through lots of wars throughout their history, and therefore,  something as fragile as stained glass surviving from the medieval time without restoration or being replaced would be too unrealistic to expect.

A magnificent rose window above main doorway…

Having a last look of the nave…

The west side of the cathedral…

On our way back, we dropped in Monoprix nearby and bought some snack and water. I urged mum to rest her back as the longest drive of our road trip awaited the next day…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

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