Museé Picasso Antibes

One of the reasons why we decided to visit Antibes was because the town had an association with Pablo Picasso.

He moved to Côte d’Azur from Paris in 1946 with his then muse, Françoise Gilot and he spent his next ten years in French Riviera.

This is a portrait of Françoise. Picasso created a series of paintings and lithographs of her as La femme-fleur – a flower-woman.

When Picasso, then 61 started a relationship with Françoise was just 21.

Even though Picasso once described a period he spent with Françoise in Antibes as “La Joie de Vivre”, her account of life with him was not so rosy. She recorded in her memoir, “Life with Picasso”, which was published in 1964, their stimulating but also tumultuous life together.

On the wall of the Musée Picasso…

A stone structure which overlooked the Mediterranean Sea was originally a Roman fort and in the 14th Century, it was rebuilt as a residence of Monaco’s ruling family, the Grimaldi.

The stronghold of the royal family became Antibes’s town hall in the early 18th Century and from 1925, the place was called the Grimaldi Museum, housing archaeological artefacts.

During the late summer of 1946, Picasso arrived to the town and he was invited to use the former guard’s hall on the second floor as his studio. Even though his stay wasn’t lengthy – only two months, he produced 23 paintings and 44 drawings.

In the studio, Picasso worked mainly in the night while Françoise stayed in their abode in Golfe-Juan which was 5.5km away from Antibes.

When Picasso was leaving, he donated all the works he created during his stay in Antibes to the museum on one condition that the works would remain in the museum permanently.

I found the gallery space very relaxed and intimate.

The amount of the exhibits may not be abundant like the one in Paris. However, the space was very unique because it was where the famous occupant created more than a few of his iconic works.

Picasso must have looked out of the window and saw the same scenery.

Picasso, he is an enigma…

His vision, his creativity, his personality, everything about him is a mystery to me.

A man with an insatiable thirst for self-expression. That is Pablo Picasso.

Now, let’s go and find the old town centre where Picasso and his friends must have had seen and lived…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Unhinged

I have no way to know if the author was telling truth but a book I bought for this weekend turns out to be a terrific entertainment!

“Unhinged” by Omarosa Manigault Newman.

Until I read an article in the New York Times, about the Emperor Small Hand, aka Donald Trump, criticised his ex-staff with his signature vulgarity, I didn’t know about the book nor her. Normally, I dismissed most of the stuff that White House spewed up because they just disgusted me but this time I was intrigued by the article. Since I am having a time-off from exercising right now, why don’t I read the book for distraction?, I thought.

Before downloading the book, I googled about it and as a result, came across a review by the Independent. The review by Andrew Griffin was bizarrely harsh and somewhat personal and I was taken aback. He sounded snobbish and even defensive for that man!

That Orange Man with Small Hands constantly criticises the media as fake news, degrading investigative journalism and destroying the liberty of media. However, Andrew Griffin’s review of the book has made me think about the integrity of the British media too. Since the major British newspapers, such as the Telegraph, the Times, Daily Mail and the Sun, are owned by Rupert Murdoch who is a personal friend of that man. I am not at all surprised if those two despicable old men are scheming to destroy our democracy and our planet because it will satisfy their monstrous egos. It is a sickening thought but if a paper which I used to respect has been influenced by the Murdoch’s fifth column and quietly changing their stance on the freedom of press and our right to know the truth?

I find no point in arguing if Omarosa’s accounts regarding that man and his administration were true. After all, it is her memoir, not a government dossier, therefore, she is entitled to have her opinion. Also, I don’t think the book has any clout to give a meaningful blow to that man any more since most of her revelations about him are already well-known amongst us.

Having said that, I am still enjoying reading this book a lot because Omarosa’s journey which she started from obscurity to become a White House aide is a classic American Dream and also the way she found herself being ousted and defamed by the system is a classic Kafkaesque nightmare. Don’t you agree with me that America is the only place where reality show stars can attain notoriety and fame? Obviously, Omarosa is one of the few who survived the rat race of the fame-hungry American mass media and kept her presence afloat.

I only wish if I were reading the book after that despot was long gone. It would be an ultimate happy ending, wouldn’t it?

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Yves Klein Blue!

My favourite colour is undoubtedly blue, and especially I love Yves Klein Blue.

I came across this article while I was checking Vogue and I was so excited!

The exhibition will be on at Blenheim Palace until 7th October and I shall visit it sometime soon!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Good As Gold Beyond Awesome

Exactly three weeks ago, Hubbie and I were at Maharishi Store on Great Pulteney Street, sipping beer and chatting to our friends and acquaintances. It was a launch party of a book, Good As Gold Beyond Awesome, and we were invited because Hubbie designed the book,

The weather then was not as hot as the one we are experiencing recently but it was pretty summery and pleasant.

The venue of the party was a well-known boutique and it had a beautiful Japanese warrior’s armour on display.

The place was buzzing with the excited crowds.

While Hubbie was putting the layouts together, I contributed to it by doing most of the typing in the book. Yes, typing, proper typing using a vintage Olivetti typewriter! Unlike word -processing with a modern keypad, typing with an old-fashioned typewriter was a pretty physical experience. It was like mini boxing with my fingers! I had to hit the keyboard hard so the letters would appear crisp and clean. And the noise of it! It was raucous. How anyone coped with those deafening sounds in the offices, especially in a room with multiple typists working, before desktop computers became norm?, I wondered.

The book was a great success.

The images were juxtaposed in such ways, it would stir your imagination.

The man himself, Ed Morris!

He may have looked a bit annoyed but he wasn’t. He was a very intense man. Right?

Bella was a bit taken aback by the amount of the crowds at the party.

I don’t know where to stay..

As she grew more mature, she developed slight shyness. As a puppy, she was very outgoing, almost a bit like manic.

Then, you don’t want to leave the party?

Oh Bay-Bay, can’t you make up your mind? We are leaving because Hubbie has started having a migraine!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Enchanté, Monsieur Trenet!

After the break we continued on A61 then changed on to A9 at Narbonne. It was around noon when we saw a sign for l’aire de Narbonne-Vinassan and decided to pull in for a quick lunch.

As we alighted from the car, we were greeted by a strange sight…

What the heck?!

A huge bronze head with a manic grin was looking down on us from the top of a small hill…

I had no idea what the sculpture was for and uploaded this image to my Instagram, asking about the meaning of it. Later days, thanks to one of my Facebook friends, the mystery was solved.

Enchanté, Monsieur Charles Trenet!

He was a French singer and songwriter who was born in Nabonne in 1913. He had many hits throughout his long career and the most famous song must be this…

“La Mer”, what a lovely song.

However, I still don’t understand why his statue was so bizarre though. A gigantic head sticking out from the mound, what was it all about? I showed the picture to Hubbie but he shrugged his shoulders and said, ‘Well, that’s French for you.’ What do you mean? I still don’t get it!, I persisted as he walked toward a kitchen to make himself a cup of tea.

Anyway, mum and I shared spaghetti carbonara and mozzarella and tomato salad…

The kitchen seemed to specialised in Italian and they offered various pizzas as well as pasta and lasagna.

Oh if only Bella were with us…

I missed you very much, Bay-Bay!

Ok, on y va a Avignon!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

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