Enchanté, Monsieur Trenet!

After the break we continued on A61 then changed on to A9 at Narbonne. It was around noon when we saw a sign for l’aire de Narbonne-Vinassan and decided to pull in for a quick lunch.

As we alighted from the car, we were greeted by a strange sight…

What the heck?!

A huge bronze head with a manic grin was looking down on us from the top of a small hill…

I had no idea what the sculpture was for and uploaded this image to my Instagram, asking about the meaning of it. Later days, thanks to one of my Facebook friends, the mystery was solved.

Enchanté, Monsieur Charles Trenet!

He was a French singer and songwriter who was born in Nabonne in 1913. He had many hits throughout his long career and the most famous song must be this…

“La Mer”, what a lovely song.

However, I still don’t understand why his statue was so bizarre though. A gigantic head sticking out from the mound, what was it all about? I showed the picture to Hubbie but he shrugged his shoulders and said, ‘Well, that’s French for you.’ What do you mean? I still don’t get it!, I persisted as he walked toward a kitchen to make himself a cup of tea.

Anyway, mum and I shared spaghetti carbonara and mozzarella and tomato salad…

The kitchen seemed to specialised in Italian and they offered various pizzas as well as pasta and lasagna.

Oh if only Bella were with us…

I missed you very much, Bay-Bay!

Ok, on y va a Avignon!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Gare de Limoges-Bénédictins

The mainline railway station in the southeast part of Limoges was one place I managed to visit while I was in the city.

It was a great shame that mum hurt herself at the very beginning of our adventure and as a result, she could not accompany me on foot to see this ornate station.

The station was less than 10 minutes walk from the hotel. A park which separated the station from the city centre seemed to be a small oasis to local people and I could see students and office workers here and there, enjoying a little “me-time” on the benches and the grass.

The first Gare de Limoges-Bénédictins, which was built of wood, was opened in 1860. The present station was designed by a French architect Roger Gonthier in 1917 and the building was listed as a monument historique in 1975.

The style of the building was distinctively Beaux-Arts. Opulent decors adorned the various parts of the exterior of the station.

Bénédictins, the part of the name of the station was due to the presence of a Benedictine monastery nearby which was closed during the French Revolution.

I entered the station, expecting the interior to be as ornate as the outside. However, I wasn’t so lucky.

Apart from the entrance and the ceilings, nothing was very notable.

The vastness of the ceiling somehow emphasised the emptiness of the interior.

After all, it was a working railway station, not a museum or a theatre. A business-like interior was more appropriate, I supposed.

A dome above the passenger concourse was constructed with a metallic framework covered in copper.

Limoges is a part of the Orléans-Montauban railway. There is the intercity services from Paris to the city which typically takes a little less than 4 hours.

A sight of railway tracks disappearing into the distance always made me feel nostalgic, and the sight I saw from Rampe des Bénédictins bore the same effect.

Before we leave the city tomorrow, I shall bring mum here by car so she can see the famous station from outside, I thought.

So she won’t feel too missed out…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

I think the film will win an Oscar.
I watched it at Barbican Cinema Sunday evening and understood why everyone who watched it was raving about it…

 

The film was poignant, funny and in some quirky way, heart-warming. I really really like it but I shan’t divulge too much because otherwise, it will spoil your fun.

Go to cinema and watch it. You won’t be disappointed.

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Phantom Thread

Last night, I started to read The Glass of Fashion, a book by Cecil Beaton which was published in 1954. And the book conveyed me to a bygone time in which high fashion was art, not industry.

Why did I have a strong urge to pick up this book was because I wanted to linger in a particular era which was portrayed in a film, Phantom Tread. The life portrayed in the film was a small slice of the 50’s post-war Britain. And it was indeed, a very privileged one. …

 

The film, which Hubbie and I saw at the Barbican Cinema, was simply exquisite. It was beautifully shot, the storyline was original and the acting was superb. I loved everything, absolutely everything in it. And of course, Daniel Day-Lewis, he was divine. The fact that he has left his acting career behind after the film makes my heart bleed! Does it mean I will never see his inimitable smile, which is elegant yet impish, ever again? I am still heartbroken.

Another thing I pined for throughout the film was how I desired to time-travel to the era in which the film was set. Even though my mum, who experienced the reality of the post-WWll, may not agree with me, I did find the time very desirable.

The reason why I liked it so much was because everything appeared to be real and tactile. The life then was conducted more elaborately and properly. General things, even trivial things such as drinking tea or putting on clothing, appearred to be done with more care and joy. And respect and appreciation towards labour and service seemed to be more just and courteous.

What is luxury? I wonder. Nowadays, we are surrounded by objects which claim themselves to be “deluxe”. From fast food to fast cars, the notion is widespread and abundant. Despite it, I just can’t help feeling that we are decidedly poorer. I ponder why.

If I could, I would love to bring back Cecil Beaton and hear what he would comment about the state of luxury in the present time. He may have a fit or worse a heart attack but also he would give damn accurate (& savaging) digs at it too…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Yeezy Peazy?

I am very sorry to be so square but I can’t stand it!

What is this? A joke? A very sick joke?

Will this absurd denim jacket be the next “it” jacket because it is coming out from the house of Balenciaga? I don’t even want to call this rubbish as “hybrid”. Why the modem fashion nowadays churns out such craps every season? What has gone wrong with fashion, especially high-fashion?

Bloody hell…

Could you please leave this kind of eyesores in your closet…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

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