Aimez-vous Brahms

I have to interrupt the report of the Waitors’ Race at Reims for today because I have come across a wonderful gem during I was beachcombing Youtube last night.

“Goodbye Again” 1961

 

The film is based on a novel by Françoise Sagan’s Aimez-vous Brahms.
I call the film a gem because the cast is amazing: Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand and Anthony Perkins, the location is glamorous: ever so beautiful Paris in the late 50’s and the costume for Ingrid Bergman: designed by Christian Dior! What not to like?

As a teenager, I read all of Sagan’s novels, imagining how it would like to be in love. Even though most of her love stories ended tragically, it didn’t put me off from reading them and I found being “ennui” impossibly grown-up and sophisticated. Oh how shallow and immature I was then.

Anyway, the film may be getting deleted from Youtube soon because of the copywright business. So watch it while it lasts!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Winding down

Bella was playing with an empty Bi-Facil bottle, and I felt blissful, sitting down on a sheepskin rug and watching her.

Things are definitely winding down. How nice.

During this holiday, I am gonna get stuck into a book, The Holy Roman Empire: A Thousand Years of Europe’s History…

While munching on my favourite treat…

Orangettes covered with dark chocolate! They are so divine, and I can’t stop eating them. There is one huge regret this Christmas though. I forgot to order my another seasonal favourite, marron glacé. I really miss the teeth-aching sweetness of the chestnut! Ahhh, l may have to run to F&M tomorrow…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Homing instinct

After taking a gulp of cider at my local pub, the Eagle, I uttered with a sigh, ‘This was what I needed the most!’ The time was around 9pm and I had just arrived back home from a very long weekend. 

My past two days were spent in Sheffield, a city in South Yorkshire, participating in a sporting event. Driving between two cities with a distance of over 320 miles (515km) did not go so smoothly as this particular weekend being a bank holiday weekend. The journey was riddled with long bottle necks and sections of much slower speed-limit which did wear me out a little, especially on my way back to London. Even though the landscape spread in front of me on M11 during I was passing through Cambridgeshire was idyllic and even picturesque, I was overjoyed when I spotted the Shard in the distance with another high-rises of Docklands. Yipee! I am coming home!!

The tournament was exciting and we came home with medals…

Despite our fridge being well stocked up by Hubbie during my absence, I fancied a glass of cider and a burger so asked Hubbie if we could eat out at a local pub.

My chicken burger and chips…

My homing instinct becomes intensified when I think of these two very important men of my life…

I missed you two very much even though I was away only for a night…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

P.S. This was taken after the match!

Photo London 2016

Hubbie had been unwell with a dodgy stomach since Friday. ‘Do you think you will be OK by tomorrow?’ I asked him as I handed him a glass of coconut water. ‘I’ll do my best’, he answered feebly as he rested his head on a pile of pillow and stared at the ceiling morosely. Oh, I feel for you, you are so unlucky…

Hubbie was so pi**ed off with himself because we were supposed to visit PHOTO LONDON the next day and he was not at all ready for it health-wise. The exhibition was designed to showcase the créme de la créme of photography from all over the world, and therefore, the scale of the show was massive – occupying almost all of the Somerset House, Strand. ‘Well, we shall assess the situation tomorrow morning, OK?’ I closed the bedroom door.

Then came next morning, Hubbie was significantly better, hence we set off for the exhibition by cab.

The venue was a lot busier than last Wednesday…

Each room was dedicated to a single gallery and the walls were covered with framed photographes in all sizes and shapes…

There were so many things to take in. The volume of visual stimulation we received by walking in and out of the galleries one after another was overwhelming and even a little mind numbing. In the end, I decided to focus on exhibits which grabbed my attention first and foremost in each room and to dismiss the rest.

Following images were the ones which caught my eye.

Ciels du Seine by Floriane de Lassée…

The images were created by giving the originals a 180 degree rotation. The idea and execution were simple. However, I found the results stunningly beautiful and they reminded me the film, Inception.

Abdulahi Mohammed with Mainasara, Lagos, Nigeria by Pieter Hugo…

Is this a dog?! Then I realised it was a hyena. A beefy black man with his muzzled beast in a very raw urban landscape, the combination created a very powerful image.

Prints with acrylic paint by Chloe Sells…

I just found the artworks irresistible. Again, the technique was simple yet the results were vibrant and otherworldly.

There were also some classics from commercial photography too.

Girls in the Windows by Ormond Gigli…

One of the main attractions of this year’s exhibition was the show by Don McCullin

He is one of the most revered war photographers of our time and his career spans from the start of Cold War to the present. Some of his most iconic images were from the Vietnum War period and this was one of them…

The picture reminded me a book I read sometime ago. It was Band of Brothers by  Stephen E Ambrose.

– Although the men lived in constant danger—a direct hit from the railway gun would destroy whole buildings—they were in a sense spectators of war. Glenn Gray writes that the “secret attractions of war” are “the delight in seeing, the delight in comradeship, the delight in destruction.” He continues, “War as a spectacle, as something to see, ought never to be underestimated.” Gray reminds us that the human eye is lustful; it craves the novel, the unusual, the spectacular.-

What effect does happening to be in the midst of armed conflicts to a normal sane individual, I asked to myself. The image was powerful.

One definite grudge Hubbie and I felt towards PHOTO LONDON was not giving Don McCullin enough space and instead, dedicating too much room to Craig Horsfield…

We were very sorry to be judgemental but we found his works mediocre and wished if his exhibits to be swapped with Mr. McCullin’s.

The staircase of West Wing was a delight to climb up and down…

The staircase was an epitome of the charm which made visiting Somerset House so special. Histric remnants of aristocratic household were everywhere and it made me feel like I was a time-traveller.

The building started its existence as a Tudor palace by the Thames and it was repeatedly redesigned and extended as it changed hands. 

I hope this snapshot I took would depict the colossal scale of the structure…

Networks of the staircases and walkways were there to make the daily machinery of the complex to run smoothly. Don’t you think it resembles M. C.Escher’s artworks?

One more image which I found charming was “For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness” by Julian Germain…

Both of us were completely exhausted by the end of the exhibition. It was so much to absorb and digest in one go. We staggered out to the street and hailed the first cab we spotted. ‘To John Lewis, please!’

We had to buy a super-king size fitted sheet but at first, we needed to refuel ourselves…

A burger and chips at Ham Holy Burger. They tasted great after a lengthy trekking at Somerset House…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

A Car Wreck Today…

I don’t know what has happened to my blog format. Font size went crazy and I have no idea how to fix it! I looked into WP’s setting page but there wasn’t any trouble-shooting for my problem (or I missed it because it wasn’t obvious?). Anyway, I will keep on looking for it when I don’t feel like a car wreck. 

In fact, I am living with perpetual muscle fatigue recently. Last night was a team practice (ice hockey!) and I am feeling the effect (or damage) of it right now, especially on my legs. It has become cruelly apparent that it is not possible to reciprocate the fitness level I enjoyed when I was in my teens & 20s no matter how hard I train. I can push myself but how I recover from it is another matter. However, I am still holding on to the towel, not throwing it in. Because I just can’t give up loving hockey! 

Happiness is…



a crowded changing room shared with my beautiful teammates…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

P.S. The font seems to be normal now! The previous post was written in a different memo app and it was cut & pasted into WP app. This action must have messed up the format. Anyway, I am glad the problem is solved!😄

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