Where is a car park?!@Lyon

I am feeling very good after finishing practicing stick-handling drills, shooting pucks and riding an exercise bike. Now, I’ve completed stretching and I am ready to update my blog!

After passing Laragne-Montéglin, we traveled along A51 northwestward. At Grenoble, we took A43 and continued another 112km towards Lyon.

Lyon was the largest city we planned to visit during the road trip (we omitted Paris because we visited numerous times already), so we were duly excited.

Lyon, on y va!

We reached the outskirts of Lyon around 13:00.

Traffic was getting busier…

We continued towards the city centre and crossed the Rhône.

The Rhône! Beautiful!!

Once crossing the river, our sight was filled with tall buildings and trees.

So where is our street?

For the road trip, I booked all of our hotels through Booking.com and one of my criteria when I came to choose lodging was how easy it was to park our car. Mum had a bad knee and we weren’t exactly light travellers – our baggage snowballed as we continued the journey! – so I wanted a public parking to be near the hotels if they couldn’t provide a private one.

Lyon!

Navigating through a large European city on foot would be confusing if you were new to the place. And the task would be even harder if you were behind the wheel and negotiating one-way streets in an unfamiliar city. I tried my hardest not to smash anyone’s side mirror as well as any pedestrian while desperately looking for a sign “P”!

All parking bays are taken!
Our street but no parking!

On Google map, there were a couple of parkings but one was only open for limited period and another one was closed except contract parkings. Eventually, we managed to find a spot in the car park which was more than a few large blocks away…

Sorry mum!

I promised mum that I would bring a car near the hotel when we were leaving the city so she would have to walk a minimum distance next day…

Too late?

May be it is a bit too late to brush up my French? Mum and I are to sail to Caen in two days and I have just restarted my French lesson!!!

Oh well, I truly hope that we won’t encounter any challenging situations during our road trip…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

J’aime l’autoroute française!

We checked out of our hotel at Reims around 10:00 and headed towards our final destination, Calais. The city was 274km away and A26 would take us there.

I must say, driving on the French motorway was a pleasure…

You see what I mean?

Especially, the landscape around Arras, was very flat and open. The scenery may have lacked the grandeur of the Alpine region with the rugged peaks and winding roads, but I preferred the calm and predictable vista on A26 after the continuous driving of the past nine days.

There was just a blue sky and golden crop fields on the both sides of the motorway…

Another thing I liked more about driving on the French motorway than on the German equivalent, was there was hardly no bullies behind their high-powered wheels. I really was fed up with those German drivers who tailgated my car and pressurised me to move to a slower lane despite my speed was nearly 90mph while we were in Bavaria.

The French autoroute was all calm and civilised…

As we got closer to Calais, we started to see more cars with the British number plates. ‘What shall we do at Calais?’ We would have more than six hours to kill before boarding a train home…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Aimez-vous Brahms

I have to interrupt the report of the Waitors’ Race at Reims for today because I have come across a wonderful gem during I was beachcombing Youtube last night.

“Goodbye Again” 1961

 

The film is based on a novel by Françoise Sagan’s Aimez-vous Brahms.
I call the film a gem because the cast is amazing: Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand and Anthony Perkins, the location is glamorous: ever so beautiful Paris in the late 50’s and the costume for Ingrid Bergman: designed by Christian Dior! What not to like?

As a teenager, I read all of Sagan’s novels, imagining how it would like to be in love. Even though most of her love stories ended tragically, it didn’t put me off from reading them and I found being “ennui” impossibly grown-up and sophisticated. Oh how shallow and immature I was then.

Anyway, the film may be getting deleted from Youtube soon because of the copywright business. So watch it while it lasts!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Spaß!

After returning to our room from our evening saunter, we turned on the TV and scrolled down to check what channels were available in Strasbourg.

My French was almost good enough to get by as a tourist. I could understand French TV programmes as long as it was not too complicated so mum and I had a load of fun during channel surfing in our hotel room. I served as a translator, and we shared lots of giggle.

Hötel Cathédrale didn’t offer any English programmes, such as BBC or CNN, but French and German. At Reims, we discovered Les Guignols and found it hilarious therefore we were looking for something similar.

Then, we found “Verstehen Sie Spaß?”(Do you understand fun?)…

A German prank show!

It was because we understood very little German, except ‘Wunderbar!’, ‘Bitte?’ and ‘Danke’, we didn’t understand what those poor victims in the show were actually saying. Still, their reactions were priceless and the ideas behind the pranks were brilliantly funny. Long live Spaß!

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

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