Tramway of Strasbourg

The history of the Strasbourg tramway started in 1878. The carriages, which traveled through the inner city, were horse-drawn at first, and the horses were replaced by electricity in 1894. While the city changed hands between France and Germany due to the consequences of two wars, the Franco-Prussian War and WWII, the original tram system served as a transport link for the inhabitants of the city.  However, the tram’s popularity waned in the 1950s as other modes of transport, such as buses, bicycles and cars, had become more readily available. And finally, the last tram departed on 1 May 1960, and there were no more of them until 1994.

Today’s tram system is very popular amongst the people of Strasbourg. It is hard to believe that it was abandoned for over three facades…

In 1994, the first tram line A, which connected the northwestern suburb of Hautepierre to the southwestern sunburn of Illkirch-Graffenstaden was opened…

Homme de Fer station for Line A & D…

By walking a little further towards Rue du Noyer, there is another Homme de Fer station for Line B, C & F…

The development of the tram system helped to revitalised the city centre as well as solved typical urban problems, such as pollution and congestion. And finally, the city authorities banned road traffic from the city centre in 1992.

Ok, that’s enough of the history lesson!

Now, mum and I have to find how to pay our fare…

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

Hot & happy in Würzburg

Anther advice given by Mr.Orange T about how to avoid the hand brake getting stuck was, not to use it altogether when I parked my car. Instead, he suggested to put a gear in first or reverse after the engine was turned off so the wheels were locked and the car would not move.

Later that day, the hand brake did misbehave again when I used it unwittingly. It was very difficult to break my old habit – using a hand brake! Ever since I was qualified to drive, I always used a hand brake if the car was stationary for more than a few minutes. The habit was ingrained into my system so deeply and it was almost an unconscious thing.

After a few errors and near misses, mum decided to place her hand over the hand brake every time I parked the car so I wouldn’t pull it up absentmindedly!

When we arrived at Würzburg, it was around three o’clock in the afternoon. The room was rather spartan-like but we were only too happy to have somewhere to put our feet up…

After freshing ourselves up, we went out to explore the city. The place appeared quiet or even subdued comparing it with bustling Strasbourg. ‘Maybe it is because today is Sunday?’ Mum and I discussed as we crossed the road with tramway tracks.

Würzburg was well known as a start / finish point of the Romantische Straße – Romantic Road. The city was also the center of the Franconian wine country and all the hillsides encircling the city were adorned with light green pinstripe patterns of grapevines, a telltale sign of the wineries.

We visited St.Mary’s Chapel – the Marienkapelle, which was built in the 14th Century…

Like most of the churches and cathedrals we would come across in Germany, the church’s external walls and stained glass windows were not original. It was due to the damage caused by aerial bombings by the Allies during WWII.

The temperature started to soar as Europe was hit by the recent heat wave. The pavement of Marktplatz was gleaming under the baking afternoon sun. Apart from the people, who were sitting in the shade provided by the street cafes, there were hardly any people in the square

We came to Schönbornstraße…

Again, no many people were on the street.

We saw trams going by…

It was so hot so we decided to have some ice cream…

‘It is like a dream comes true!’

I confided to mum how blissful I felt as I lick my lemon sorbet. I was with my beloved mum in Würzburg, sitting on the same bench and talking face to face! What more could I want?

Kaori by Kaori Okumura

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